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Unix

fasd – a smarter cd

Once upon a time I used to use https://github.com/wting/autojump as a way for my systems to help me quickly navigate to my favorite Directories Of Interest. Basically, it did (and similar tools also do) the following:

  • cd is instrumented to capture directory locations each time one visits a new directory, and store them in a wee sort of database
  • an alternative “cd” command is introduced that attempts to Do What I Mean. It takes the input, and sees what stored directory best matches, with a bias towards frequently used directories

autojump was written in Python, which is no grand problem; I did some poking around, and discovered a newer tool, https://github.com/clvv/fasd, which has similar capabilities, perhaps more, and has a slightly smaller footprint, being implemented in “POSIX shell,” so it can happily run on common shells such as Bash (and my fave) zsh.

So far, I have just been using the “zz” functionality that picks the seemingly-most-relevant directory. It does a fine job of this.

It is doubtless a good idea to poke some more at this; running “fasd a b c” searches recent directories for highest-relevance files containing “a” “b” and “c”, fairly successfully. Throwing multiple strings pulls up an interesting list:

cbbrowne@karush ~> fasd tmux conf
1 /home/cbbrowne/.tmux.conf
12 /home/cbbrowne/GitConfig/InitFiles/tmux/tmux-home.conf

Without much effort, this locates tmux configuration files; that’s looking pretty attractive…